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Great Homer Street Market: The Great Survivor?

Click and collect, order online, home delivery, the face of modern shopping, you might think. However, within the Scotland Road area, there is an old favourite, a popular and much loved market which draws customers from the locality and beyond, even attracting coach parties. Welcome to Great Homer Street Market, ‘The Greaty’ and in these fast moving times, The Great Survivor.

Scottie Press went along to The Greaty one cold and snowy Saturday morning in March to talk to customers and traders to find out how this well regarded traditional street market continues to thrive.

Angie says, ‘It’s great.  I have two teenagers who like the fashion stalls.  It’s cheap.’

Chris’ mother used to have a second hand clothes stall in the past in market.  He had brought his friend June who said, ’I come for books on Liverpool history and on Irish History.’

Patrick said, ‘I come for me cobs and the doughnuts.  I live local.  I like the size of it, the layout, plenty of stalls.  Markets are cheaper.’

Maureen comes from Wigan with her sister who lives in Fazakerley. ‘We come every week.  We get bedding, towels, fresh veg, kids’ toys.  We only go to five stalls and then we go home.’

Bethia said, ’I love it.  They say it’s not the same, but this new facility is really good, with the roof. I’m not from Liverpool but I like the atmosphere, the banter, the jokes you hear. Stallholders chat to you.  It’s like this business was.  There are a lot of socialists here.  I get a Scottie Press for myself and two for elderly friends.’

’I love it.  They say it’s not the same, but this new facility is really good, with the roof. I’m not from Liverpool but I like the atmosphere, the banter, the jokes you hear. Stallholders chat to you.  It’s like this business was.  There are a lot of socialists here.  I get a Scottie Press for myself and two for elderly friends.’

Trader Pat calls her stall Housewives Choice.  ‘I got dragged here as a kid. The market should always be here. On a nice day, it’s electric.  People come for meeting up.  When my daughter has finished her visit she says, ‘I’ve had my fix.’ I’m from Scotland Road.  We’ve got time for people, for the craic.’

She sees one of her customers, ‘Here’s Dougie.  He comes every week to fight with me, don’t you Dougie?’

‘I’m not fighting this week. It’s too cold,’ says Dougie.

Bookseller Roy has been in business for fifteen years and operates online as well. He supplies books on local history, fiction and non-fiction. ‘The market is busy and vibrant.  My customers range from children to older people. Based on what people buy, I recommend other authors for them.  Older people like James Patterson and when they’ve read them all, I refer them on. I also exchange books, sort of recycling them.  If you look around, there are no younger sellers. They work indoors for pin money. Older traders work out here under cover or in the open.  You have to be able to cope with the weather.’

Good value products and good prices keep people coming back to the Greaty. Personal contact extends beyond banter.  If a trader doesn’t have something you ask for, they will offer to have it for you the following week. 

Looking at what is now becoming a leisure and retail corridor framed by Scotland Road and Great Homer Street, leading to Anfield and Goodison, the latter relocating to Bramley Moore Dock, you wonder about the future of this kind of street market.  As yet, there aren’t any artisan stalls selling bread for £2.50 a loaf or sausages for £1.50 each, which you often come across in craft and heritage markets  elsewhere.

The Greaty has moved about in other guises over the years from Paddy’s market and the Cazzy on Cazneau Street in this area but it is still here, thriving.

The Great Survivor has a future, doesn’t it?

Stall Holder Angie